SAFETY

 

5

1

,

0

2

,

4

9

,

1

1

DAYSHOURSMINUTESSECONDS

COUNTS

Our record:

193days
18hours
53minutes

AUSTRALIA

 

 

,

1

6

6

,

1

7

,

1

9

YEARSDAYSHOURSMINUTES

ASIA

 

8

,

1

2

0

,

1

5

,

4

9

YEARSDAYSHOURSMINUTES

AMERICAS

 

 

,

3

5

4

,

2

2

,

3

4

YEARSDAYSHOURSMINUTES

EUROPE

 

 

,

 

5

1

,

0

2

,

4

9

YEARSDAYSHOURSMINUTES

MEA

 

2

,

3

4

9

,

2

2

,

3

4

YEARSDAYSHOURSMINUTES

SAFETY FLASH

SOLVE A DILEMMA

1st Dilemma

A crew-member turns up for work on a vessel that’s new to him. He has worked on a sister vessel and thus work procedures are similar. However, the crew-member discovers that he does not have access to a laptop or mobile device, which means the HMS is not available. There is no written handover note either hence he has no means to see what risks or actions are open. The operations team are very keen to see the vessel working straight away, and inform the crew-member to get underway soon as possible. What should he do?

2nd Dilemma

A delivery driver turns up at the office and requests offloading of three pallets of towlines, a job his driver says is urgent. The store man and port engineer are the only ones onsite licenced to drive the forklift truck (for offloading), however, one of them is on holiday and the other is off ill. The delivery driver points out that the keys are still in the ignition and – claiming to have lots of experience driving a forklift truck – jumps onto the forklift and quickly starts the engine. He tells the office staff representative that if the job doesn’t get done now, he would need to make another trip for delivery, which would cost extra. What actions should the office staff member take, both immediately and preventively?

3rd Dilemma

It is 22:30 on a Saturday. The master returns from leave and finds the vessel lying alongside the quay on shore power with no one on board. It is the weekend, so the onshore staff is at home. The master gets a call from the pilot telling her to start up and depart ASAP as a ship is three miles from the breakwater. There has been no handover from the off-signing crew, and there are tools left in the engine room near a hydraulic watertight door. What should the master do?

4th Dilemma

An engineer complains of feeling unwell and goes home. Another engineer from the local crew is called in on overtime as a replacement, but his experience is on a completely different tug type – a Voith rather than an ASD. When the replacement arrives on board, the master is eager to quickly get underway, as they have a ship to berth in one hour. The engineer could do with the extra money and is hesitant to speak up and say that he is not entirely familiar with the machinery layout.  After all, the main engines and the winch are similar to the ones he is used to, and he knows there is no one else available on such a short notice. What are the correct actions for the master and engineer as well as for the operator that sent the engineer to the vessel?

5th Dilemma

During a safety tour, the crew notice some damage to the shell plating and find part of the fending missing in the same area. The crew are certain that the damage was caused during the previous crew-shift; so should they immediately report it? Will this evoke a negative reaction from the other crew? What is the correct procedure when encountering such damage?

6th Dilemma

In the office meeting room a senior manager is about to present an important briefing to staff members. Cables from the projector and a power extension have been trailed across the floor in a tangle, creating a tripping hazard close to the emergency exit. Should the staff members speak up and suggest that the situation should be immediately corrected by taping down or removing the cables and extension cord?

7th Dilemma

On boarding a vessel for a visit to the local tugs, the port manager identifies the smell of cigarette smoke in the engine room and asks the engineer about it. The engineer replies that it is OK for him to smoke in the engine room, just not in the accommodation or bridge. How should the port manager address this?

8th Dilemma

A crew member sustains a deep cut to his finger while preparing dinner for the rest of his crew. He doesn’t like making a fuss and is unsure if he should tell anyone. What are the correct actions he should take and why?

9th Dilemma

One side of the handrail of a gangway is in poor condition, unusable, and the replacement is over a week away from arriving.  What action should the crew take?

10th Dilemma

The master and engineer are making preparations to sail. After completing the pre-departure checklist, there is still no sign of the third hand. The ship is now requesting the tug to leave immediately, as they are ready to sail. What is the correct action for the master to take?

11th Dilemma

In a towage operation it appears that the towed vessel is going to run aground. Should you continue trying to avoid the grounding of the towed vessel and risk damaging your tug, or should you protect the tug by allowing the towed vessel to run aground?

12th Dilemma

While picking up printer paper in an office stores room, you notice that one of the lamps is hanging from the ceiling in a corner by only one cord. It is hanging low enough for a person to accidentally bump into it. However the lamp is in a corner and doesn’t seem about to fall down just now. You’re busy and in a rush to make a printout for a customer meeting.  What should you do?

13th Dilemma

A fairly new crew-member notices that the master is on his personal mobile, either texting or browsing while handling the tug during a job. This is a senior and experienced master, who has been with the company for many years. What should the crew-member do?

14th Dilemma

A port is under pressure to meet customer contracts, as one of the Svitzer tugs had an unplanned out of service issue. They have managed to borrow a tug from another port, but no proper planning for vessel transfer was completed and the old crew did not stay for familiarisation with the new crew. The involved personnel were aware of transfer and familiarisation procedures, but were prepared to bend the rules on this one. What is the correct action for the port manager, master and crew in the port where this transferred tug must now operate?

15th Dilemma

A member of operations staff discovers that a tug has an overdue condition of class (COC) but is the only available resource for a job replacing a competitive tow company in the port. The master says not to worry, as the process of fixing the COC has been initiated. Should the operations staff stop the tug from working (and lose the job) or allow them to keep working?

16th Dilemma

An engineer trips and falls on the deck while boarding. A deckhand working with him smells alcohol on his breath and challenges him about his drinking. The engineer says he has had only one beer and is fine to work.  Should the deckhand accept the engineer’s argument about one beer being acceptable or inform the master or the port office – or both?

17th Dilemma

An electrical contractor has been engaged to remove, overhaul, and replace a burned out electric fire pump motor on a vessel. The contractor returns unexpectedly to the tug base when the vessel is unmanned between periods of crew duty. The local port management allow the contractor crew to access the vessel and work on their own, so the tug will be ready for the next shift. Is it acceptable that the port management allow the contactor to work unsupervised?

18th Dilemma

An office employee slips on an office staircase, falls, and lightly strains her back and wrist.  The incident is discussed informally in office, and it seems the employee will be unable to work the next day. It is suggested that a report is to be made in the HMS – but the office workers do not believe that the HMS applies to them. Should the office manager report the incident in HMS and call regional office?

19th Dilemma

A captain falls from the stairs and hurts his leg. He limps for the rest of the day with obvious pain and discomfort. However, he tells the crew that he is fine and that he is fit enough to do the scheduled tow job later that evening. How should the crewmembers react?

20th Dilemma

A vessel is being mobilised between regions as part of an intercompany sale. The vessel mobilisation and delivery is being carried out by a third-party company. The local operations manager, who is responsible for the project must ensure mobilisation in seven days to meet the deadline and has been told by the third-party delivery master that the vessel is ready to sail.  The local operations manager however finds that the vessel hasn’t been inspected and no paperwork has been submitted or signed-off in the HMS.  The local operations manager know the procedures should be followed, but will cause at least two days delay of vessel delivery to the valued customer. What should the local operations manager do?